Publications

Further information on publications and books that we produce and contribute to are available here.

  • Paper: Momentum is increasing towards a flexible electricity system based on renewables

    February 2, 2016

    Paper: Momentum is increasing towards a flexible electricity system based on renewables

    Momentum is increasing towards a flexible electricity system based on renewables By: Catherine Mitchell Published in: Nature Energy 1, Article number: 15030 (2016), doi:10.1038/nenergy.2015.30 Available online: 1st February 2016 Abstract Total global energy use is rising, and remains based on fossil fuels. Yet, the challenge of climate change requires a deep decarbonization of our energy system. Here I argue that the global energy policy discourse is moving rapidly towards one of renewable, energy-efficient and flexible electricity systems. This is primarily because of a rapid take-up within a few countries of variable renewable electricity sources over the past

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  • Submission: National Infrastructure Commission call for Evidence

    January 21, 2016

    Submission: National Infrastructure Commission call for Evidence

    National Infrastructure Commission call for Evidence Catherine Mitchell, Energy Policy Group, University of Exeter Summary   We, the Energy Policy Group of the University of Exeter, welcome the NIC’s investigation. We argue that the fundamental problem for GB energy infrastructure and the balancing of supply and demand within markets is that the current GB governance system is not fit for purpose. IGov, a project within the EPG, has put forward an alternative governance framework (as shown in Figure 1, 2 and 3). We believe if this governance framework were put in place, competition between the

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  • Paper: Governing for sustainable energy system change

    January 4, 2016

    Paper: Governing for sustainable energy system change

    Governing for sustainable energy system change: Politics, contexts and contingency By: Caroline Kuzemko, Matthew Lockwood, Catherine Mitchell and Richard Hoggett Published in: Energy Research & Social Science, Vol 12, Feb 2016, pp: 96–105 doi:10.1016/j.erss.2015.12.022 Available online: 31 December 2015 Abstract This paper offers a new, interdisciplinary framework for the analysis of governing for sustainable energy system change by drawing together insights from, and offering critiques of, socio-technical transitions and new institutionalist concepts of change. Institutions of all kinds, including rules and norms within political and energy systems, tend to have path-dependent qualities that make them difficult to change, whereas

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  • Submission: CMA Code Governance – info request to industry participants

    December 14, 2015

    Submission: CMA Code Governance – info request to industry participants

    CMA Code Governance: info request to industry participants  Catherine Mitchell, Matthew Lockwood and Richard Hoggett, Energy Policy Group, University of Exeter Introduction The University of Exeter Energy Policy Group (EPG), and in particular the Innovation and Governance project (IGov) within the EPG, has been very involved in the ongoing CMA Energy Market Investigation. Our original submission to the CMA’s Statement of Issues paper highlighted the problem of Codes in relation to competition and innovation within the GB Energy System. We then gave oral evidence, the summary of which is now up on the CMA’s website

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  • Paper: Climate Change Benchmarking – constructing a sustainable future?

    December 9, 2015

    Paper: Climate Change Benchmarking – constructing a sustainable future?

    Climate Change Benchmarking: constructing a sustainable future? By: Caroline Kuzemko Published in: Review of International Studies, 41, pp 969-992 doi:10.1017/S0260210515000418 Available online: 25 November 2015 Abstract This article analyses discourses on climate change and mitigation through the deconstruction of European Union (EU) rhetoric and practices on climate benchmarking. It critically examines the motivations behind climate benchmarking, the methods used to construct international benchmarks, and the reasons for variety in domestic compliance. Germany and the United Kingdom are analysed as cases where domestic politics drive very different reactions to the practice of climate mitigation, differences that have

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  • Paper: Codes Governance and Reform Discussion Paper

    November 24, 2015

    Paper: Codes Governance and Reform Discussion Paper

    Codes Governance and Reform Discussion Paper IGov Team, 24th November 2015* This discussion paper summarises some of the key points that were raised at a recent cross industry workshop run by the Energy Policy Group on the future of gas and electricity code governance in October 2015. More details of the event are available on IGov events page. The paper provides: Background context on the main energy industry codes and standards in Great Britain A history of reform efforts A summary of the key issues raised at the Codes Governance Workshop covering: 1) Access to Information; 2) Code Simplification

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  • Book Chapter: Politicising UK energy: what ‘speaking energy security’ can do

    September 30, 2015

    Book Chapter: Politicising UK energy: what ‘speaking energy security’ can do

    New book chapter from Caroline Kuzemko: Politicising UK energy: what ‘speaking energy security’ can do in M. Flinders and M. Wood (eds) Tracing the Political – Depoliticisation, governance and the state, published by Policy Press. For more information visit the Policy Press website. Over the past two decades politicians have delegated many political decisions to expert agencies or ‘quangos’, and portrayed the associated issues, like monetary or drug policy, as technocratic or managerial. At the same time an increasing number of important political decisions are being removed from democratic public debate altogether, leading many commentators

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  • Book Chapter: Electricity Markets and their Regulatory Systems for a Sustainable Future

    September 25, 2015

    Book Chapter: Electricity Markets and their Regulatory Systems for a Sustainable Future

    New book chapter from Catherine Mitchell: Electricity Markets and their Regulatory Systems for a Sustainable Future. In Ekins, P., Bradshaw, M., and Watson, J. (eds) Global Energy: Issues, Potentials, and Policy Implications. Oxford University Press. September 2015. For more information visit Oxford University Press. Energy, and access to energy, are essential to human life, civilisation and development. A number of energy issues – including energy security, energy prices and the polluting emissions for energy use – now have high prominence on global agendas of policy and diplomacy. In addressing these and other global energy issues, the purpose

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  • Submission to CMA Energy Market Investigation – Provisional Findings & Possible Remedies

    September 4, 2015

    Submission to CMA Energy Market Investigation – Provisional Findings & Possible Remedies

    Comments on the CMA Energy Market Investigation – Provisional Findings and Possible Remedies Catherine Mitchell, Bridget Woodman, Matthew Lockwood, Jessica Britton, Caroline Kuzemko and Richard Hoggett, Energy Policy Group (EPG), University of Exeter Introduction 1) The Energy Policy Group (EPG) is pleased to make comment on the Provisional Findings Report (PF) and on the Possible Remedies report (PR). In the past, we have input a submission to the CMA’s Statement of Issues. We then gave oral evidence, the summary of which is now up on the CMA’s website. We then commented on the Updated Issues We

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  • Viewpoint: We must not recreate the wrong market model

    August 29, 2015

    Viewpoint: We must not recreate the wrong market model

    On Reflection: We must not recreate the wrong market model Catherine Mitchell, IGov Team, 28th August 2015 EUROPE: The EU’s proposal for a new Electricity Market Design turns a blind eye to the elephant in our midst. Operating wholesale electricity markets that set payments based on the marginal cost of generation is an energy model that needs a rewrite. The more the wind blows and the sun shines, the more electricity is fed into the market, driving down prices as demand is saturated. Low prices might sound like good news for electricity customers, but for

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