Lampbrush chromosome research workers

Numbers in blue link to corresponding pdf.



 


Michel Bellini

Graduated from: Pierre et Marie Curie University, 1993.

Current Position: Assistant Professor. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, School of Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Interests: Organization of the nucleus; Chromosomes and other nuclear organelles; RNA transcription and processing; Ribonucleoproteins; Nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking

Current Address: Dr. Michael Bellini, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Department of Cell and Structural Biology, Room C522 Chemical and Life Science Laboratory, 505 South Goodwin, Urbana, Illinois 61801 USA.

Tel. : (217) 265-529; Fax: (217) 244 1648; E-mail: bellini@life.uiuc.edu
Web: http://mcb.illinois.edu/faculty/profile/bellini

Selected publications:

Bellini M (2000)
Bellini M, Gall JG (1998)
Bellini M, Gall JG (1999)
Bellini M, Lacroix J-C, Gall JG. (1993)
Bellini M, Lacroix J-C, Gall JG (1995)
Bucci S, Ragghianti M, Nardi I, Bellini M, Mancino M, Lacroix J-C (1993)
Gall JG, Bellini M, Wu Z, Murphy C (1999)

 


Professor H G Callan FRS, well known to all his many friends and colleagues throughout his life as Mick, was the co-founder, together with Joe Gall, of modern lampbrushology.  His greatest single contribution to the field was an exhaustive and far-reaching study of the LBCs of newts of the genus  Triturus, published jointly with his assistant Mrs. Lydia Lloyd, in 1960 (Callan & Lloyd, 1960).  The results of his many later researches, alongside those of all others in the field were brought together in his book on lampbrush chromosomes published by Springer in 1986 (Callan, 1986). 

Mick died in 1993 at the age of 76.  The accompanying photograph of him on this page was taken by Jim Kezer in 1965 at the height of Mick's scientific career when he was 49 and had just developed the highly stimulating and controversial Master/Slave theory of  molecular genetics.

An obituary can be found in Chromosome Research, 1994, 2, 83-86


Dmitry Dedukh

Graduated from: the University of Saint-Petersburg, Department of Vertebrate Zoology (2012)

Current position: PhD student of Saint-Petersburg State University, Laboratory of chromosome structure and function

Master project: Study of hybridogenetic European water frogs complex (Pelophylax esculentus) using cytogenetic analysis of growing oocytes

Active research in lampbrushology: since 2010

Field of scientific interest: Processes of hemiclonal inheritance and poliploidization in European water frogs complex, amphibian lampbrush chromosomes, amphibian oogenesis.

Current address: Biological Institute of St. Petersburg University, Oranienbaumskoye rd., 2, Stary Peterhof, St.Petersburg 198904, Russia

Selected publications:

Dedukh et al. (2013)

 


Svetlana Derjusheva

Graduated from: Saint-Petersburg University, Department of Genetics (1990)

Current position: Researcher in the Lab. of Chromosome Structure & Function, Biological Institute, St. Petersburg University

PhD project: Cytogenetics of horses (1998)

Active research in lampbrushology: since 1999

Skills: lampbrush chromosomes, mitotic chromosomes, chromosome banding, cell culture, FISH, PRINS, DNA labeling, DNA cloning, recombinant DNA, processing and analysis of microscopic images

Current address: Biological Institute of St. Petersburg University, Oranienbaumskoye rd., 2, Stary Peterhof, St.Petersburg 198904, Russia

Tel. : (+7-812) 4507311; Fax: (+7-812) 4507310; E-mail: svederjusheva@hotmail.com

Selected publications:

Derjusheva et al. (2003), (2007)
Derjusheva & Gall (2004)
Gaginskaya et al. (2002)
Galkina et al. (2006)
Krasikova et al. (2004), (2006)
Saifitdinova et al. (2003)

 


Professor Elena Gaginskaya, Ph.D., D.Sc., FSB.

Graduated from: Saint-Petersburg University, Department of Vertebrate Zoology (1955)

Current position: Professor of the Department of Cytology & Histology, Saint-Petersburg State University

PhD project: Cytological aspects of avian oogenesis (1972)

D.Sc. project: Functional morphology of avian chromosomes during oogenesis (1989)

Active research in lampbrushology: since 1982

Field of scientific interest: avian oogenesis, avian genome organization, lampbrush chromosome structure and functions, intranuclear bodies, centromere protein bodies, karyosphere formation, transcription on lampbrush chromosomes, biological significance of lampbrush chromosomes

Current address: Biological Institute of St. Petersburg University, Oranienbaumskoye rd., 2, Stary Peterhof, St.Petersburg 198904, Russia

Tel. : +7 921 3042981; Fax: (+7-812) 4507310; E-mail: elena.gaginskaya@gmail.com

Selected Publications:

Khodyuchenko et al. (2012)
Zlotina et al. (2012)
Gaginskaya et al. (2009)
Derjusheva et al. (2004), (2007)
Krasikova et al. (2005)
Saifitdinova et al. (2001), (2003)


Svetlana Galkina, Ph.D.

Graduated from: the University of Saint-Petersburg, Dept of Cytology & Histology (1998)

Current position: Associate Professor, Department of Cytology & Histology, Saint-Petersburg State University

Master project: The chicken chromosome physical and genetics maps: comparative analysis of mitotic chromosomes and lampbrush chromosomes using FISH (1998)

PhD project: Comparative research of mitotic and lampbrush chromosomes using banding and FISH techniques (2002)

Active research in lampbrushology: since 1993

Skills: lampbrush chromosome manipulation, general and molecular cytogenetics methods, recombinant DNA and molecular cloning technique, FISH, PCR, pulse-electrophoresis

Field of scientific interest: Lampbrushology, molecular cytogenetics of bird, high precision gene mapping, chromosome rearrangements, karyotype evolution

Current address: 7/g Universitetskaya emb., St.Petersburg 199034, Russia

Tel. : (+7-812) 4507311; Fax: (+7-812) 4507310; E-mail: svetlana.galkina@mail.ru

Selected publications:

Galkina et al. (2005), (2006)
Rodionov et al. (2002)
Solinhac et al. (2010)
Zlotina et al. (2010, 2012)

 


Professor Joseph G Gall is a cell biologist whose work has centred on the organization and expression of genes on chromosomes. As a graduate student in the early 1950s, he examined the LBCs of the American newt Notophthalmus. He soon began to correspond with Mick Callan in Scotland, who was also studying these poorly understood structures in the European newt Triturus. Thus arose a 40-year collaboration and personal friendship that lasted until Callan's untimely death in 1993.

Gall's major interests in the amphibian germinal vesicle and LBCs can be summarised under the following headings:

Basic structure of LBCs. Gall and Callan separately worked out the basic structure of LBCs paired sister loops extending laterally from an axis of condensed, inactive chromatin.
Transcription on LBC loops. In 1962, Gall and Callan showed that LBC loops incorporate 3H-uridine, establishing that a major function of LBCs is transcription of RNA.
Organisation of DNA in chromatid. Following the seminal observation by Macgregor and Callan that LBC loops are cleaved by DNase, Gall analyzed the kinetics of this reaction and provided direct evidence that the chromatid of a vertebrate chromosome is equivalent to a single DNA molecule.
Nuclear pore complex. Gall provided the first demonstration of octagonal symmetry in nuclear pores.
Amplified rDNA in the GV. Around 1967-68 several people more of less simultaneously "rediscovered" rDNA amplification in the amphibian GV. Using incorporation of 3H-thymidine Gall confirmed both cytologically and biochemically that rDNA amplification occurs primarily during the early prophase of the 1st meiotic division.
In situ hybridization. Using the favourable material provided by the amplified rDNA in Xenopus oocytes, Gall and Mary Lou Pardue developed the technique of in situ hybridization (1969). This technique, particularly with the later introduction of fluorescent probes, is today crucial for the subcellular localization of RNA and DNA sequences.
Organization of histone genes. Using the histone gene locus Gall and his students explored the relationships among the coding regions, the intergenic non-coding satellite type DNA, and the physical transcription units on the LBCs of the newt. They also showed the specific association of "spheres" (later histone locus bodies) with the histone gene locus.
Nuclear bodies. Gall and his students studied nuclear bodies in the amphibian GV, as well as in various tissues of Drosophila. These studies focused on two major structures, the Cajal body and the histone locus body (HLB). Both bodies contain the marker protein coilin and were confused with each other in earlier work. Cajal bodies contain components of the splicing machinery, whereas HLBs contain molecules involved in histone pre-mRNA processing. The exact relationships between the bodies and processing remain unclear.

The most recent and current studies in the Gall laboratory are reported on the News page of this website.

Joe is the American Cancer Society Professor of Developmental Genetics in the Department of Embryology of the Carnegie Institution for Science.

Current address: Joseph G. Gall, Carnegie Institution for Science, 3520 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218

Tel. : 410-246-3017; Fax: 410-243-6311; E-mail: gall@ciwemb.edu

Selected publications:

Talhouarne and Gall (2014)
Gall (2012), (2014)
Gardner et al. (2012)
Kaufmann, Cremer and Gall (2012)
Liu and Gall (2012)
Gall and Wu (2010)

 


Professor James Kezer

Jim Kezer died at his home in Eugene Oregon on January 3rd 2002, aged 94. His obituary can be found in Chromosome Research volume 10, issue 2, page 175.

Jim Kezer was Professor of Biology at the University of Oregon in Eugene, Oregon, USA until he retired in 1974. He was born in 1908.

Jim introduced plethodontid salamanders to lampbrushologists when he visited Joe Gall's lab at the University of Minnesota in 1962. Thereafter he worked with Mick Callan (St.Andrews), Pedro Leon (Costa Rica), Herbert Macgregor (St.Andrews and Leicester), Stan Sessions (Hartwick College, N.Y.) and others in a series of investigations on a number of unique and truly remarkable features of the oocyte nuclei and lampbrush chromosomes of a range of amphibian species.

His discovery of the multinucleate oocytes of the Pacific tailed frog, Ascaphus truei (Macgregor and Kezer 1970), his studies of the lampbrush nucleolar organizer and nucleolar rings in Plethodon (Kezer and Macgregor 1973), as well as the early discovery and characterization of a centromeric satellite DNA in Plethodon [Macgregor, H.C. and J. Kezer. The chromosomal localisation of a heavy satellite DNA in the testis of Plethodon c. cinereus . Chromosoma (1973) 33: 167-182] are especially noteworthy.

Jim was also the initiating force behind one of the first ever studies to show the usefulness and significance of DNA in molecular phylogenetic studies. Without his help, advice and knowledge, Mizuno and Macgregor could not have accessed the many species of Plethodon that feature in this study [Mizuno, S. and H.C. Macgregor . Chromosomes, and sequences and evolution in salamanders of the genus Plethodon. Chromosoma (1974) 48: 239-296].

Special mention must also be made of his wide ranging cytogenetic studies of plethodontids and especially of his discovery of some spectacular examples of sex chromosome heteromorphism in Central American species [see, for example, Kezer, Sessions and Leon (1989)The meiotic structure and behaviour of the strongly heteromorphic X/Y sex chromosomes of neotropical plethodontid salamanders of the genus Oedipina. Chromosoma 98: 433 ­ 442].

To a great many biologists who graduated from the University of Oregon in the 1960s and 1970s ­ some of whom are now front line chromosome scientists - Jim Kezer is known and fondly remembered for his outstanding teaching skills which were largely founded on his tremendous enthusiasm for his subject and the sense of fun that he imparted to his students.

The accompanying photograph was taken in 1981 by Garry Morgan during a visit to Jim Kezer's home in Eugene.


Tatiana Khodyuchenko

Graduated from: the University of Saint-Petersburg, Dept of Cytology & Histology (2009)

Current Position: Postdoc, Department of Cytology and Histology, Saint-Petersburg State University (since 2013)

PhD project: Molecular composition and dynamics of coilin-positive bodies in pigeon Columba livia oocyte nucleus

Active research in lampbrushology: since 2007

Skills: lampbrush chromosome isolation, working with animal oocytes, oocyte nuclei manipulations, oocyte microinjections, immunofluorescent staining of chromosomes and cells, FISH on chromosomes, fluorescent microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, PCR, DNA and protein electrophoresis, western-blotting

Field of scientific interest: organization and composition of oocytes in amphibia and birds, compartments of the cell, architecture of avian oocyte, avian oogenesis

Current address: Biological Institute of St. Petersburg University, Oranienbaumskoye rd., 2, Stary Peterhof, St.Petersburg 198504, Russia

Tel. : (+7-812) 4507310; Fax: (+7-812) 4507310; E-mail: tatianakhod@gmail.com

Selected publications:

Khodyuchenko et al. 2012


Alla Krasikova

Graduated from: Saint-Petersburg State Polytechnical University, The Faculty of Physics and Mechanics, Department of Biophysics, 2003

Current Position: Senior Researcher, Associate Professor. Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Cytology and Histology

PhD project: Morphological and functional investigation of nuclear structures associated with centromeric regions of avian lampbrush chromosomes. St. Petersburg State University, 2007

Field of scientific interest: functional compartments of the cell nucleus, genome architecture, regulation of transcription, functions of non-coding RNAs, organization of centromere regions of chromosomes, avian and amphibian lampbrush chromosomes, centromere-associated protein bodies, karyosphere formation

Current address: Biological Institute of St. Petersburg University, Oranienbaumskoye rd., 2, Stary Peterhof, St.Petersburg 198904, Russia

Tel. : (+7-812) 4507310; Fax: (+7-812) 4507310; E-mail: alla.krasikova@gmail.com

Selected publications:

Gaginskaya E, Kulikova T, Krasikova A (2009)    (14)
Krasikova A, Vasilevskaya E, Gaginskaya E (2010)  (9)
Krasikova A, Gaginskaya E (2010)
Krasikova A, Daks A, Zlotina A, Gaginskaya E (2009)  (15)
Maslova AV and Krasikova AV (2011)   (1)


Tatiana Kulikova

Graduated from Saint-Petersburg University, Department of Cytology and Histology (2004).

Current position: research fellow in the Laboratory of Chromosome Structure & Function, Department of Cytology and Histology, Saint-Petersburg State University.

Master project: Structures associated with telomere and centromere regions of avian lampbrush chromosomes.

PhD project: Nuclear domains involved in nuclear retention of poly(A)+ RNA in growing oocytes of birds and frogs.

Active research in lampbrushology: since 2002.

The field of scientific interests: nuclear compartmentalization and genome expression in oogenesis, lampbrush chromosomes, non-coding RNA, epigenetics.

Current address: Biological Institute of St. Petersburg University, Oranienbaumskoye rd., 2, Stary Peterhof, St.Petersburg, 198904, Russia.

Tel.: (+7-812)  4507310  Fax:  (+7-812)  4507310   E-mail:   t.v.kulikova@gmail.com

Publications:

Derjusheva et al. (2007)   (21)
Gaginskaya et al. (2009)   (14)
Krasikova et al. (2004)   (31)

 


Professor Herbert Macgregor

Herbert Macgregor was originally a student of H.G.Callan's at the University of St.Andrews in Scotland. In 1970 he became the Professor of Zoology and Head of the Department of Zoology at the University of Leicester, England. He retired from his post at Leicester in 1996 and is now a Professor Emeritus of Zoology at Leicester and a Visiting Professor at the School of Biosciences of the University of Exeter, England. His research has centred on the organization and expression of gene sequences in chromosomes, with a special emphasis on the genomes of amphibians and birds and extensive exploitation of the superb opportunities offered by these groups for studies on lampbrush chromosomes. Herbert Macgregor is the former and founding editor of the journal Chromosome Research and author of two books (Macgregor & Varley 1988, Macgregor 1993).

Current address: Professor H.C.Macgregor, School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4PS, United Kingdom

Email: herbert.macgregor@exeter.ac.uk

Selected publications:

Macgregor (1993), (2012a), (2012b)
Macgregor et al. (1997)
Mizuno & Macgregor (1998)
Solovei et al. (1994)
Solovei et al. (1996)


Antonina Maslova

Graduated from: Ivanovo State University, Department of Physiology (2008)

Current Position: Postdoc, Department of Cytology and Histology, Saint-Petersburg State University (since 2013)

PhD project: Spatial genome organization in giant nuclei of avian and amphibian oocytes and significance of nuclear actin in its maintenance.

Active research in lampbrushology: since 2008

Field of scientific interest: 3D architecture of avian oocyte nucleus, karyospere formation, spatial genome organization in somatic cell nuclei, nuclear actin, avian satellite repeats, image processing

Current address: Biological Institute of St. Petersburg University, Oranienbaumskoye rd., 2, Stary Peterhof, St.Petersburg 198504, Russia

Tel. : (+7-812) 4507310; Fax: (+7-812) 4507310; E-mail: maslova_a.v@mail.ru

Publications:

Maslova A and Krasikova A (2011), (2012)

 


Professor Shigeki Mizuno

Professor Shigeki Mizuno died on January 11th 2005..  He was a scientist of outstanding skill and intellect who latterly played a leading role in the chicken genome mapping project. A close friend and colleague recently described him as a man of calm, kindness and wisdom.  He will be fondly remembered by all who knew and worked with him over the years.  His obituary was published in Chromosome Research volume 13, pages 111 - 112 (2005).

_____________________________

Graduated from: the University of Tokyo, Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Chemistry (1959)
Ph.D. from the University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Agricultural Science (1964)
Assistant, Faculty of Agriculture and the Institute of Applied Microbiology, University of Tokyo (1964-1970)
Research Associate in Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington, University of Leicester, Department of Zoology, Mayo Clinic, Department of Molecular Medicine (1970-1977)
Assistant Professor, Science University of Tokyo, Department of Applied Biological Science (1977-1982)
Assistant Professor, Tohoku University, Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Chemistry (1982-1984)
Professor (1984-2000), Dean, Tohoku University, Graduate School of Agricultural Science (1998-2000)
Professor Emeritus, Tohoku University (2001)
Professor, Nihon University, College of Bioresource Sciences (2001-2005)

Interest in chicken LBCs: localization of specific repetitive DNA family into a specific chromomere; fine mapping of active genes or specific DNA sequences on loops, chromomeres of lampbrush W chromosome by FISH; transcription of specific genes on particular pairs of loops; DNA sequence and structural features of W-Z pairing region, identification of a centromeric region on the lampbrush W chromosome.

Selected publications:

Hori et al. (1996)
Mizuno and Macgregor (1998)
Ogawa et al. (1997)
Solovei et al. (1998)
Teranishi et al. (2001)

 


Garry Morgan

Graduated from: University of Leicester, School of Biological Sciences (1975)

PhD project: Studies of the organization and function of meiotic chromosomes in urodeles (University of Leicester 1978)

Current position: Lecturer, Institute of Genetics, University of Nottingham, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK

Active research in lampbrushology: 1975-1980; 1997 to present.

Field of scientific interest: Nuclear organization and its relationship to nuclear gene expression. Transcription elongation and termination. Molecular characterization of transcription and RNA processing complexes in lampbrush loops and associated nuclear bodies.

Tel. : +44 (0)115 823 0390; Fax: +44 (0)115 823 0338; E-mail: garry.morgan@nottingham.ac.uk

Selected publications:

Morgan GT (2002), (2007)
Morgan GT et al. (1980), (2000)
Varley JM and Morgan GT (1978)


Zehra F. Nizami

Education: B.A. from the Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, 2003. Ph.D. from the Department of Biology, Johns Hopkins University, 2012. Thesis work carried out in Joe Gall's laboratory at the Department of Embryology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Baltimore MD.

Ph.D. project: Structure and Function of Cajal bodies and histone locus bodies in Drosophila and Xenopus nuclei.

Current position: Postdoctoral fellow in Joe Gall's laboratory at the Department of Embryology, Carnegie Institution for Science.

Field of scientific interest: Structure and function of amphibian LBCs, particularly in Xenopus, Notophthalmus, and Ambystoma. Organization of nuclear organelles, including "pearls" found at polymerase III loci of Xenopus LBCs. Currently analyzing nascent transcripts from the oocyte of Xenopus by RNAseq (Sept. 2014).

Current address: Department of Embryology, Carnegie Institution for Science, 3520 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218.

Tel.: 410-246-3027; Fax: 410-243-6311; E-mail: nizami@ciwemb.edu

Selected publications:

Gardner et al. (2012)
Nizami and Gall (2012)
Nizami et al. (2010a, 2010b)


May Penrad-Mobayed

Graduated from: Pierre et Marie Curie University : Doctorat de 3ème cycle. Embryology (1981); Doctorat d’Etat ès Sciences Naturelles (1995)

Current position: Permanent senior staff scientist. National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS)

Active research in lampbrushology: since 1983

Field of scientific interest: amphibian lampbrush chromosomes and those of Pleurodeles waltl and Xenopus tropicalis in particular. Sex chromosomes and sex determination. RNA transcription and processing. Molecular characterization of nuclear structures. hnRNPs and hnRNP G/RBMX in particular. Role of Sox9 and Foxl2 in the amphibian oocyte (in progress).

Current address: Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS & Université Paris Diderot, Department « Molecular and Cellular Pathology, Bât.Buffon – 5th floor, 15 rue Hélène Brion, 75205 PARIS CEDEX 13 - FRANCE

Tel. : +33(0)1 57 27 81 17/18; Fax: +33(0)1 57 27 80 87; E-mail: penrad@ijm.univ-paris-diderot.fr

Selected publications:

Angelier et al. (1990), (1991), (1996)
Bonnanfant-Jaïs et al. (1985), (1986), (1991), (1993)
Delelis-Fanien et al. (2000)
Kanhoush et al. (2009), (2011)
N'Da et al. (1986)
Penrad-Mobayed et al. (1986), (1991), (1998), (2009), (2010), (2011)


Alsu Saifitdinova, Ph.D.

Graduated from: the University of St. Petersburg, Dept of Embryology (1994)

Current position: Director of "Chromas" Research Resource Center, Saint-Petersburg State University

Master project: Analysis of nuclear protooncogenes c-fos and c-jun expression in mouse embryogenesis (1994)

PhD project: Highly repeated sequence FCP isolated from chaffinch genome: its structure, localization and functional peculiarities in generative and somatic cells (2001)

Active research in lambrushology: since 1996

Skills: work with animal and human embryos, histological techniques, RNA isolation, micromanipulation of oocyte nuclei and chromosomes, manual lampbrush chromosome isolation, preparation of mitotic chromosomes, human cytogenetical diagnostic, recombinant DNA manipulation, molecular hybridization, FISH, GISH, PRINS, immunocytochemistry, light microscopy, computer imaging

Field of scientific interest: Evolution, genome structure, chromosome organization, nuclear compartmentalization, satellite DNAs, mechanisms of transcription, lampbrush chromosomes

Current address: St. Petersburg University, Universitetskaya nab, 7-9, St. Petersburg 199034, Russia

Tel. : +7-812-4507311; E-mail: a.saifitdinova@spbu.ru

Website: chromas.spbu.ru

Selected publications:

Dedukh et al. (2013)
Derjusheva et al. (2003)
Krasikova et al. (2004)
Saifitdinova et al. (2000), (2001), (2003)


 


Irina Solovei

Graduated from: University of St. Petersburg, Faculty of Biology, Department of Cytology and Histology (1981).
PhD degree from the same University (1984); thesis on defense reactions of invertebrate blood cells under supervision of Oleg Chaga and A.A.Zavarzin.
First started to work with lampbrush chromosomes as a postdoctoral researcher in the Laboratory of Chromosome Structure & Function in the Biological Institute (University of St.Peterburg) headed by Elena Gaginskaya. Between 1990-1996 was a holder of several Wellcome Trust Fellowships for work in collaboration with Prof. H.C.Macgregor of Leicester University.
Between 1984 and 1996 developed the standard protocol for preparation of bird lampbrush chromosomes and studied their organization with special regard to (i) identification of lampbrush chromosomes in chicken, quail, turkey, and pigeon; (ii) transcription of selected sequences depending on their chromosome position; (iii) presence and function of certain hnRNPs on specific LBC loops; and (iv) chromomere composition of chicken sex W-chromosome.
Current position: Senior research scientist at the Institute of Anthropology and Human Genetics, Biozentrum, University of Munich (LMU), Germany. Current research is on the interphase nuclei. (1) Spatial organization of the interphase nucleus: positioning, shape and orientation of chromosome territories and relation of these parameters to the nuclear functions. (2) Organization of the chromosome territory: large scale chromatin folding and its relation to transcriptional activity. (3) Spatial organization of nuclei in native tissues and tissue-specific features of the nuclear and chromosomal architecture. (4) Mechanisms establishing nuclear and chromosomal architecture in the cell cycle and during terminal cell differentiation. 

Current address:

University of Munich (LMU), Biozentrum, Department Biology II, Grosshadernerstr. 2, D-82152 Martinsried

Tel. : +49 (0)89 2180 74 223; Fax: +49 (0)89 2180 74 236; E-mail: irina.solovei@mail.lrz-muenchen.de
Web:http://www.humangenetik.bio.lmu.de/personen/epigenetik/wiss_mit/index.html

Selected publications:

Hori T, Suzuki Y, Solovei IV, Saitoh Y, Hutchison N, Ikeda E, Macgregor H, Mizuno S (1996)    (47)
Ogawa A, Solovei IV, Hutchison N, Saitoh Y, Ikeda J-E, Macgregor H, Mizuno S (1997)   (44)
Solovei IV, Joffe BI, Gaginskaya ER, Macgregor HC (1996)  (48)
Solovei IV, Macgregor H, Gaginskaya E (1995)   (49)
Solovei IV, Ogawa A, Naito M, Mizuno S, Macgregor H (1998)   (41)



Zheng'an Wu

Graduated from: Graduate School of the Peking (Beijing) University, Department of Biology (1965).

PhD from: University of Hiroshima, Faculty of Science and Laboratory for Amphibian Biology (1988).

Current position: Visiting Scientist, Department of Embryology, Carnegie Institution, Baltimore, MD (laboratory of J. G. Gall)

Interests: Molecular organization of the nucleus; chromosomes and other nuclear organelles; molecular characterization of transcription and RNA processing complexes in lampbrush chromosomes and nuclear bodies.

Current mailing address: Carnegie Institution of Washington, Department of Embryology, 3520 San Martin DRive, Baltimore, MD21218, USA

Tel. : ++1-410-554-1225; Fax: ++1-410-243-6311; E-mail: zwu@ciwemb.edu

Selected publications:

Gall JG et al. (1995), (1999)
Handwerger KE et al. (2002)
Wu Z and Gall JG (1997)
Wu Z et al. (1994)


Anna Zlotina

Graduated from: Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Cytology and Histology

Current position: Postdoc, Saint-Petersburg State University (since 2013)

PhD project: Comparative cytogenetic analysis of karyotypes in Galliform species.

Active research in lampbrushology: since 2007

Skills: lampbrush chromosomes, mitotic chromosomes, FISH, PCR, sequencing, immunocytochemistry, processing and analysis of microscopic images.

Current address: Oranienbaumskoe sh., 2, Stary Peterhof, St.Petersburg 198504, Russia

Tel. :(+7-812) 450 73 11, Fax: (+7-812) 450 73 10

E-mail: anna-zlotina@yandex.ru

Website: chromas.spbu.ru

Selected publications:

Daks et al. (2010)     (7)
Krasikova et al. (2009, 2012)   (15)
Zlotina et al. (2010, 2012)   (8)

 

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